Saturday, July 21

CERVICAL CANCER  Destroyer of Women Cervix
(See Video below)
Cervical cancer is an uncommon type of cancer that develops in a woman’s cervix. The Cervical cancer is an uncommon type of cancer that develops in a woman’s cervix. The cervix is the entrance to the womb from the vagina.
Cervical cancer often has no symptoms in its early stages. If you have symptoms, the most common is unusual vaginal bleeding, which can occur after sex, in between periods or after the menopause.cervix is the entrance to the womb from the vagina.
Cervical cancer often has no symptoms in its early stages. If you have symptoms, the most common is unusual vaginal bleeding, which can occur after sex, in between periods or after the menopause.

Most cervical cancer is caused by a virus called human papillomavirus, or HPV. You can get HPV by having sexual contact with someone who has it. There are many types of the HPV virus. Not all types of HPV cause cervical cancer. Some of them cause genital warts, but other types may not cause any symptoms.

You can have HPV for years and not know it. It stays in your body and can lead to cervical cancer years after you were infected. This is why it is important for you to have regular Pap tests. A Pap test can find changes in cervical cells before they turn into cancer.

  • Causes and risk factors for cervical cancer have been identified and include human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, having many sexual partners,smoking, taking birth control pills, and engaging in early sexual contact.
  • HPV infection may cause cervical dysplasia, or abnormal growth of cervical cells.
  • Regular pelvic exams and Pap testing can detect precancerous changes in the cervix.
  • Precancerous changes in the cervix may be treated with cryosurgery, cauterization, or laser surgery.
  • The most common symptoms and signs of cervical cancer are abnormal bleeding and pelvic pain.
  • Cervical cancer can be diagnosed using a Pap smear or other procedures that sample the cervix tissue.
  • Chest X-raysCT scanMRI, and aPET scan may be used to determine the stage of cervical cancer.
  • Cancer of the cervix requires different treatment than cancer that begins in other parts of the uterus.
  • Treatment options for cervical cancer include radiation therapy, surgery, and chemotherapy.
  • Two vaccines, Gardasil and Cervarix, are available to prevent HPV infection.
  • The prognosis of cervical cancer depends upon the stage and type of cervical cancer and the tumorsize.
Human papillomavirus(HPV) infection of the cervix can lead to cervical cancer. A vaccine designed to prevent cervical cancer and other diseases caused by infection with HPVs was approved for use in the U.S. in June 2006. This is the first vaccine to be developed against a known risk factor for the development of a cancer.

While some HPV types infect the skin and cause benign wartsand other lesions, about 40 types of HPVs can infect the genital tract. Genital HPV infection is very common in the general population; estimates suggest that up to 50% of all sexually active people will be infected at some point in their lives. In the majority of cases, the infection does not cause any symptoms, but in somewomen, HPV infection can progress to cause precancerous and cancerous lesions of the uterine cervix. HPVs that infect the genital area are also associated with other less common genital cancers in men and women such as cancers of the anus, vagina, penis, and vulva. HPV infection also causes genital warts in menand women.
The most common HPV types that infect the genital area are HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18. Among these, HPV types 6 and 11 are most commonly associated with benign lesions, such as genital warts and mild precancerous changes of the cervix. In contrast, HPV types 16 and 18 are the types found in the majority of cancers as well as in severe precancerous changes of the cervix. The vaccine, called Gardasil, targets these four common HPV types.

Although cervical cancers start from cells with pre-cancerous changes (pre-cancers), only some of the women with pre-cancers of the cervix will develop cancer. The change from cervical pre-cancer to cervical cancer usually takes several years, but it can happen in less than a year. For most women, pre-cancerous cells will go away without any treatment. Still, in some women pre-cancers turn into true (invasive) cancers.


"A Must Have for Cervical Cancer Patients "

Cervical Cancer Statistics

CERVICAL CANCER  How Many Women Affected Today

Cervical cancer used to be the leading cause of cancer death for women in the United States. However, in the past 40 years, the number of cases of cervical cancer and the number of deaths from cervical cancer have decreased significantly. This decline largely is the result of many women getting regular Pap tests, which can find cervical precancer before it turns into cancer.1 For more information, visit HPV-Associated Cervical Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity.
In 2008 (the most recent year numbers are available)—
  • 12,410 women in the United States were diagnosed with cervical cancer.*2
  • 4,008 women in the United States died from cervical cancer.*2
*Incidence and death counts cover approximately 100% of the U.S. population.
Cervical cancer incidence is related to age but it is unusual as it does not follow the same pattern of increasing incidence with age seen for most cancers  There are two peaks in the age-specific incidence rates: the first in women aged 30-34 (at 21.2 per 100,000 women) and the second in women aged 80-84 (at 14 per 100,000 women). The earlier peak is related to many women becoming sexually active in their late teens/early 20s, giving rise to the increase of the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV - a precursor to cervical cancer development). The second peak is due to increasing cancer incidence with age. In the UK between 2007 and 2009, an average of 21% of new cervical cancer cases were in people aged 65 years and over.
Over three-quarters (76%) of cervical cancer cases occur in 25-64 year olds. Women in England and Northern Ireland are currently offered cervical cancer screening at three to five year intervals between ages 25 and 64. For women in Wales, screening is offered between the ages of 20 and 64 every three years. In Scotland, women are offered screening every three years between the ages of 20 and 60

Worldwide, cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women and the seventh most common overall (in both sexes combined). It is estimated to be responsible for 530,000 new cases of cancer in 2008 (nearly one in ten (9%) of all cancers diagnosed in women). Cervical cancer incidence rates are lowest in Western Asia and highest in Eastern Africa, with a seven-fold variation in World AS incidence rates between the regions of the world.
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Tuesday, July 17

OVARIAN CANCER  Scary Disease Of Women
(See Video Below)
Ovarian cancer is the ninth most common cancer among women, excluding non-melanoma skin cancers. It ranks fifth in cancer deaths among women, accounting for more deaths than any other cancer of the female reproductive system. Ovarian cancer accounts for about 3% of all cancers in women. A woman's risk of getting ovarian cancer during her lifetime is about 1 in 71. Her lifetime chance of dying from ovarian cancer is about 1 in 95.

This year, an estimated 22,280 women in the United States will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer. It is estimated that 15,500 deaths from this disease will occur this year. Ovarian cancer accounts for nearly 3% of all cancers among women. It is the ninth most common cancer and fifth most common cause of cancer-related death in women.

Ovarian cancer is most common in women who have had the menopause (usually over the age of 45), but it can affect women of any age.
As the symptoms of ovarian cancer can be similar to those of other conditions, it can be difficult to recognise. However, there are early symptoms to look out for, such as pain in the pelvis and lower stomach, persistent bloating and difficulty eating.

There are several types of ovarian cancer. 

  • epithelial ovarian cancer, which affects the surface layers of the ovary; it is by far the most common type 
  • germ cell tumours, which originate in the cells that make the eggs
  • stromal tumours, which develops within the cells that hold the ovaries together
Epithelial ovarian cancer is by far the most common type of ovarian cancer. This information concentrates on epithelial ovarian cancer.

The exact cause of ovarian cancer is unknown, although a number of possible factors are thought to be involved, such as the number of eggs the ovaries release, and whether someone in your family has had ovarian cancer in the past. However, only one in 10 cases of ovarian cancer has a genetic link.
These are the stages of ovarian cancer:
  • Stage I: Cancer cells are found in one or both ovaries. Cancer cells may be found on the surface of the ovaries or in fluid collected from the abdomen.
  • Stage II: Cancer cells have spread from one or both ovaries to other tissues in the pelvis. Cancer cells are found on the fallopian tubes, the uterus, or other tissues in the pelvis. Cancer cells may be found in fluid collected from the abdomen.
  • Stage III: Cancer cells have spread to tissues outside the pelvis or to the regional lymph nodes. Cancer cells may be found on the outside of the liver.
  • Stage IV: Cancer cells have spread to tissues outside the abdomen and pelvis. Cancer cells may be found inside the liver, in the lungs, or in other organs.
There are no standard recommendations for screening for ovarian cancer. Screening women with pelvic ultrasound or blood tests, such as the Ca-125 has not been found to be effective and is not recommended.
BRCA testing may be done in women at high risk for ovarian cancer.
Removal of the ovaries and tubes in women who have a mutation in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes may reduce the risk of developing ovarian cancer, although ovarian cancer may still develop in other areas of the pelvis.


" A Must Have for Ovarian Cancer Patients! "

Saturday, July 14


An asbestos-related cancer is any cancer that can be caused by asbestos exposure. Lung cancer is the most frequently diagnosed asbestos-related cancer in the United States, affecting about 4,800 people each year.
Mesothelioma is the second-most diagnosed cancer caused by asbestos. It affects about 3,000 people in the U.S. each year and it is almost exclusively caused by the naturally occurring mineral. Two other cancers confirmed to be caused by asbestos include ovarian cancer and laryngeal cancer.

Mesothelioma cancers are the cancers that spread in the mesothelium tissues. Mesothelium in general is the name of tissue that forms lining of different body organs such as heart, lungs, abdomen and reproductive organs. The lining around abdominal organs is known as peritoneal membrane. Lining around lungs is called pleural membrane while the lining around heart is called pericardium.

These linings perform two functions. They protect the internal organs by producing a lubricating fluid and to allow the smooth movement of the internal organs. Mesothelioma cancers are the cancers affecting these membranes. The names of the cancers depend on the tissue or linings they affect. Peritoneal mesothelioma, pleural mesothelioma and pericardial mesothelioma are the names of cancers of linings of abdomen, lungs and heart, respectively. Pleural mesothelioma is the most common of all mesothelioma cancers and is found in 70 % of the mesothelioma patients. Peritoneal mesothelioma constitutes 10% to 20% of the mesothelioma patients while third type pericardial mesothelioma, is rare.

Symptoms of mesothelioma cancers are same as of other common diseases. It makes diagnosis mesothelioma cancers a difficult task. Pain and swelling in abdomen, weakness, loss of weight, loss of appetite and nausea are some symptoms of peritoneal mesothelioma. Symptoms of pleural mesothelioma are persistent cough, difficulty in breathing, weight loss, loss of appetite, weakness, chest pains, lower back pains and difficulty in swallowing. Mesothelioma cancers goes back to as far back as 1900s. It took about 60 years to gather sufficient information about these mesothelioma cancers. By the end of sixth decade of last century, experts could conclude that exposure to asbestos particles is the reason behind the disease. 

One alarming fact about the mesothelioma cancers is its extended latency period. These cancers may remain asymptomatic in the body for even up to 50 years. Chances of survival for mesothelioma patients are rare and the average survival period after diagnosis is not more than 12-24 months. Surgery if diagnosed early, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are some common treatments for all types of mesothelioma cancers. 


Although many countries ban or restrict the use of asbestos, that ban is not universal. Some developing countries continue to mine and use asbestos – considered a toxic mineral by nearly all health officials – because it is relatively inexpensive compared to other substitute products. WHO officials estimate that 125 million people around the world are annually exposed to asbestos in the workplace, and the International Labor Organization says about 100,000 workers die each year from an asbestos-related disease.


Sunday, July 8

SKIN CANCER Ravaging All Races Worldwide

Skin cancer is the uncontrolled growth of abnormal skin cells. It occurs when unrepaired DNA damage to skin cells (most often caused by ultraviolet radiation from sunshine or tanning beds) triggers mutations, or genetic defects, that lead the skin cells to multiply rapidly and form malignant tumors. Skin cancer is the most common of all cancers. It accounts for nearly half of all cancers in the United States. More than 2 million cases of basal and squamous cell skin cancer are found in this country each year. Melanoma, the most serious type of skin cancer, will account for more than 75,000 cases of skin cancer in 2012.

There are several different types of cancer, all of which are very dangerous and must be detected early in order to have the best possible prognosis. Skin cancer, which is an increasingly common form, is often associated with over exposure to sun or other ultraviolet radiation, including tanning beds. Because individuals with fair skin are more susceptible to a sunburn, they are also more susceptible to skin cancer. In order to protect themselves from the sun’s strength, individuals should wear sunscreen with a high SPF, hats and long sleeve shirts. In addition, taking special care to not fall asleep in the sun or spend hours every day in it’s presence may help to lessen it’s harmful effects and possibly may even prevent skin cancer.

Melanoma, the most serious type of skin cancer, will account for more than 75,000 cases of skin cancer in 2012. It accounts for almost 9,000 of the nearly 12,000 skin cancer deaths each year.
The overall 5-year survival rate for melanoma is 91%. For localized melanoma, the 5-year survival rate is 98%; survival rates for regional and distant stage diseases are 62% and 16%, respectively. About 84% of melanomas are diagnosed at a localized stage

  • Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States. More than 3.5 million skin cancers in over two million people are diagnosed annually.
  • Each year there are more new cases of skin cancer than the combined incidence of cancers of the breast, prostate, lung and colon.
  • Symptoms of skin cancer are various, but the most common is a lesion that will not heal. This may also include discoloration and overall changes in the appearance of moles. The majority of skin cancer patients can be treated with a surgical procedure that involves removing the affected layers of the skin. If skin cancer is left untreated, however, it may begin to involve the deeper layers of the skin and possibly even the lymphatic system. In addition, it may spread to other parts of the body and become resistant to treatment if not detected early.

Of all the various forms of cancer, Skin cancer has one of the highest survival rates because, unlike the others, skin cancer is usually visible and leads to earlier detection. If a skin lesion does not heal within 7 to 10 days, or if a mole begins to change in shape, color or otherwise vary in appearance, a physician should be consulted in order to determine whether or not the lesion is cancerous. During testing, a piece of the skin will be removed by the physician and sent to a medical laboratory for further testing. If the test results are positive for the presence of cancer, the physician will invite the patient to return to his/her office for a conversation regarding possible treatment options.


COLON CANCER Curing The Disease Within

Excluding skin cancers, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in both men and women in the United States. The American Cancer Society's most recent estimates for the number of colorectal cancer cases in the United States are for 2012:
  • 103,170 new cases of colon cancer
  • 40,290 new cases of rectal cancer
Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States when men and women are considered separately, and the second leading cause when both sexes are combined. It is expected to cause about 51,690 deaths during 2012.

Most cases of colon cancer begin as small, noncancerous (benign) clumps of cells called adenomatous polyps. Cancerous tumors found in the colon or rectum also may spread to other parts of the body. Cancer of the colon and rectum (colorectal cancer) is a malignant tumor arising from the inner wall of the large intestine. If signs and symptoms of colon cancer do appear, they may include changes in bowel habits, blood in your stool, persistent cramping, gas or abdominal pain. Since colon cancer can grow for years without causing any symptoms, it's best to get regular colon cancer screenings.

Almost all men and women age 50 and older should have a colon cancer screening.  For normal risk individuals, screening tests begin at age 50 and the preferred approach is a screening colonoscopy every 10 years; an alternate strategy consists of annual stool test for blood and a flexible sigmoidoscopic exam every 3 to 5 years.

Special screening programs are used for those with a family history of colorectal cancer. Colonoscopic surveillance (also called screening colonoscopy) needs to be available at more frequent intervals for individuals at high risk for colon cancer (for instance, those with a personal history of colorectal cancer or adenomatous polyps; family history of colorectal cancer; non-hereditary polyposis; colorectal cancer; or a pre-disposing condition such as inflammatory bowel disease. Since your genes cannot be changed, if there is a family history of colon polyps or cancer, a colonoscopy should be performed to remove the polyps before they become malignant.

In the area of prevention, researchers are looking at the effects of curcumin (found in curry), resveratrol (found in red wine), ginger and the Mediterranean diet on the growth and development of colon cancer. Recent research suggests that a high fiber, low-fat diet plays a role in prevention; how great a role it plays is unclear. Although the exact cause of colorectal cancer is not known, it is possible to prevent many colon cancers through: diet and exercise. It is important to manage the risk factors you can control, such as diet and exercise.

A well known detox diet for your body is the increasingly popular lemon detox diet, which incorporates a number of ingredients and requires you to consume a drink of these ingredients once everymorning, then drinking water with a hint of lemon juice throughout theday. Generally, a healthy and safe detox diet will not require you to starve yourself, and it contains highly nutritious food that can help to boost your metabolism.  

Detoxification is an efficient process of removing toxins from the body. The bodies natural detoxification system had simply not evolved to deal with the future man made pollutants that were to come. With the increase of toxins within the environment and foods we eat, it is not surprising that the majority of people are at a level of toxicity that is past the point that the bodies own natural detoxification system can cope with. Detoxification kits may be bought from health food stores, or a qualified practitioner or natural physician can recommend detox products.


Cancer of the colon is a highly treatable and often curable disease when localized to the bowel. Surgery is the primary form of treatment and results in cure in approximately 50% of the patients. Recurrence following surgery is a major problem and is often the ultimate cause of death.


Saturday, July 7

(Watch The Video Below)

Estimated new cases and deaths from anal, anal canal, and anorectal cancer in the United States in 2012:
This year, an estimated 6,230 adults (2,250 men and 3,980 women) in the United States will be diagnosed with anal cancer. It is estimated that 780 deaths (300 men and 480 women) from this disease will occur this year.

The five-year survival rate (percentage of people who survive at least five years after the cancer is detected, excluding those who die from other diseases) for early, localized anal cancer is between 53% and 71%, depending on the type of cancer
New cases: 6,230.
Deaths: 780.
Risk factors include the following:
Being older than 50 years.
Being infected with human papillomavirus (HPV).
Having many sexual partners.
Having receptive anal intercourse (anal sex).
Frequent anal redness, swelling, and soreness.
Having anal fistulas (abnormal openings).
Smoking cigarettes.

A digital rectal exam (DRE) will find some cases of anal carcinoma early. This test is sometimes used to look for prostate cancer in men (because the prostate gland can be felt through the rectum). The rectal exam is also done routinely as part of a pelvic exam on women. In this exam, the doctor inserts a gloved, lubricated finger into the anus to feel for unusual lumps or growths. If you are at increased risk for anal cancer, ask your doctor whether more frequent exams are needed.
Anal cancer is an uncommon malignancy and accounts for only a small percentage (4%) of all cancers of the lower alimentary tract. Clinical trials such as EST-7283R, for example, have evaluated the roles of chemotherapy, radiation therapy, and surgery in the treatment of this disease.

The odds that anal cancer can be found early depend on the location and type of the cancer. Cancers that begin higher up in the anal canal are less likely to be found early. Melanomas tend to spread earlier than other cancers making it more difficult to diagnose in an early stage.

The skin around the outside of the anus is called the perianal area. Tumors in this area are skin tumors, not anal cancer.

Anal cancer is usually curable. The three major prognostic factors are site (anal canal vs. perianal skin), size (primary tumors <2 cm in size have better prognoses), and nodal status.



Friday, July 6

BREAST CANCER  Every Women Must Know Today

(Watch Video Below)
In 2011, an estimated 230,480 new cases of invasive breast cancer were expected to be diagnosed in women in the U.S., along with 57,650 new cases of non-invasive (in situ) breast cancer. It is, in fact, the most common malignancy problem that is affecting women in North America and Europe today. It is estimated that 226,870 women will be diagnosed with and 39,510 women will die of cancer of the breast in 20121.
(The following information is based on NCI’s SEER Cancer Statistics Review)

How Breast Cancer is Acquired? 

Breast cancer occurs when malignant tumors in the breast grow and start to affect other tissues in the body. There is still no clear indications how tumors are created but what is often observed is that cancerous cells usually comes from ducts or glands. 

Although women’s health organizations advise women to massage the breast daily and to feel for any lumps, it may a long time before a cancerous cell get big enough for us to feel it. By that time, it may already be too late. Doctors make use of mammograms for their diagnosis.

About 5-10% of breast cancers can be linked to gene mutations (abnormal changes) inherited from one’s mother or father. Mutations of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are the most common. Women with these mutations have up to an 80% risk of developing breast cancer during their lifetime, and they are more likely to be diagnosed at a younger age (before menopause). An increased ovarian cancer risk is also associated with these genetic mutations

In men, about 1 in 10 breast cancers are believed to be due to BRCA2 mutations, and even fewer cases to BRCA1 mutations.

What Are the Risk

All women are actually at risk, with the risk increasing with the presence of some risk factors that are already part of the natural cycle, for example, aging. Family history of breast cancer can also significantly affect the prognosis as heredity has been found to play a role. Women who got their periods before they were 12 years old and those who never had or had children after 30 years old are also more likely to develop breast cancer.

A woman’s risk of breast cancer approximately doubles if she has a first-degree relative (mother, sister, daughter) who has been diagnosed with breast cancer. About 15% of women who get breast cancer have a family member diagnosed with it

There are also risk factors that medical science can help alter such as hormonal problems through replacement therapies. Women are also advised to decrease their consumption of alcoholic drinks, exercise every day and decrease the use of birth control pills. Breastfeeding has been found to decrease the risk of breast cancer development. 

Although there are some factors that women can avoid to prevent breast cancer from developing, cause and effect relationships between these factors and breast cancer is still debatable. For women who are already at high risk, doctors often recommend a drug called Tamoxifen, which is known to decrease the risk by as much 50 percent when taken in five years. Still, Tamoxifen has side effects such as hot flushes, vaginal discharges and sometimes even blood clots. Taking the drug can also lead to pulmonary emobolus, stroke and uterine cancer, although these are all isolated cases. 

Another avenue that women can go to is Vitamin A, which some studies show to be effective in decreasing the risk. Still, research is still in the initial stages and nothing has been proven yet. Other things that are being linked to the breast cancer fight are phytoestrogens, which can be found in soya, Vitamin E, and Vitamin C. 

But until something concrete is found in research, the only thing that women can do to ensure that they are safe from breast cancer is early detection. This can be done through daily self-examinations as well as annual check ups and mammogram tests. It is also important that women know the beginnings of breast cancer. Here are some of the signs that they should watch out for. 

Lumps in the breast and in the underarms
Scaling of the skin of the breast and of the nipple
Redness in the skin of the breast and of the nipple
Changes in the size of their breasts
Discharges from the nipple

Watch Breast Cancer Video Here:

If these signs are observed, it is best to consult a specialist so that you can know whether you have breast cancer or not.
Good News!
In 2011, there were more than 2.6 million breast cancer survivors in the US. Treatments are improving.

What is CANCER?
(Watch Video Below)
The body is made up of trillions of living cells. Normal body cells grow, divide, and die in an orderly fashion. During the early years of a person’s life, normal cells divide faster to allow the person to grow. After the person becomes an adult, most cells divide only to replace worn-out or dying cells or to repair injuries.

Cancer, known medically as a malignant neoplasm, is a broad group of various diseases, all involving unregulated cell growth. Cancer starts when cells in a part of the body start to grow out of control. Cancer cell growth is different from normal cell growth. Instead of dying, cancer cells continue to grow and form new, abnormal cells. Cancer cells can also invade (grow into) other tissues, something that normal cells cannot do. Growing out of control and invading other tissues are what makes a cell a cancer cell.

Cells become cancer cells because of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) damage. DNA is in every cell and it directs all the cell’s actions. In a normal cell, when DNA gets damaged the cell either repairs the damage or the cell dies. In cancer cells, the damaged DNA is not repaired, and the cell doesn’t die like it should. Instead, the cell goes on making new cells that the body doesn’t need. These new cells all have the same abnormal DNA as the first cell does.

In most cases, the cancer cells form a tumor.  The cancer may also spread to more distant parts of the body through the lymphatic system or bloodstream. Not all tumors are cancerous. Benign tumors do not grow uncontrollably, do not invade neighboring tissues, and do not spread throughout the body. There are over 200 different known cancers that afflict humans.

Watch Cancer Video Here

The three most common cancers in men 
Prostate cancer/ Lung cancer/ Colon cancer

The three most common cancers in women
Breast cancer/ Colon cancer/ Lung cancer


2012 Complete List of Cancers
Some cancers are more common in certain parts of the world.

  1. Advanced Cancer
  2. Adrenal Cortical Cancer
  3. Anal Cancer
  4. Aplastic Anemia
  5. Bile Duct Cancer
  6. Bladder Cancer
  7. Bone Cancer
  8. Bone Metastasis
  9. Brain/CNS Tumors In Adults
  10. Brain/CNS Tumors In Children
  11. Breast Cancer
  12. Breast Cancer In Men
  13. Cancer in Children
  14. Cancer of Unknown Primary
  15. Castleman Disease
  16. Cervical Cancer
  17. Colon/Rectum Cancer
  18. Endometrial Cancer
  19. Esophagus Cancer
  20. Ewing Family Of Tumors
  21. Eye Cancer
  22. Gallbladder Cancer
  23. Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumors
  24. Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST)
  25. Gestational Trophoblastic Disease
  26. Hodgkin Disease
  27. Kaposi Sarcoma
  28. Kidney Cancer
  29. Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancer
  30. Leukemia - Acute Lymphocytic (ALL) in Adults
  31. Leukemia - Acute Myeloid (AML)
  32. Leukemia - Chronic Lymphocytic (CLL)
  33. Leukemia - Chronic Myeloid (CML)
  34. Leukemia - Chronic Myelomonocytic (CMML)
  35. Leukemia in Children
  36. Liver Cancer
  37. Lung Cancer - Non-Small Cell
  38. Lung Cancer - Small Cell
  39. Lung Carcinoid Tumor
  40. Lymphoma of the Skin
  41. Malignant Mesothelioma
  42. Multiple Myeloma
  43. Myelodysplastic Syndrome
  44. Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer
  45. Nasopharyngeal Cancer
  46. Neuroblastoma
  47. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma
  48. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma In Children
  49. Oral Cavity and Oropharyngeal Cancer
  50. Osteosarcoma
  51. Ovarian Cancer
  52. Pancreatic Cancer
  53. Penile Cancer
  54. Pituitary Tumors
  55. Prostate Cancer
  56. Retinoblastoma
  57. Rhabdomyosarcoma
  58. Salivary Gland Cancer
  59. Sarcoma - Adult Soft Tissue Cancer
  60. Skin Cancer - Basal and Squamous Cell
  61. Skin Cancer - Melanoma
  62. Small Intestine Cancer
  63. Stomach Cancer
  64. Testicular Cancer
  65. Thymus Cancer
  66. Thyroid Cancer
  67. Uterine Sarcoma
  68. Vaginal Cancer
  69. Vulvar Cancer
  70. Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia
  71. Wilms Tumor

This Blog will share more information of all these types of cancers, useful for research tools for students, groups, institutions, and personal matters. Free for the world to see its latest news, breakthrough and treatments.